US new proposal to stop warrantless reading of emails
Thu 5 Feb 2015, 10:00

Legislation that aims to put a stop to warrantless reading of emails got a fillip Wednesday with bills introduced both in the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives to amend the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.

The bipartisan “Electronic Communications Privacy Act Amendments Act of 2015” will require the government to have a search warrant to obtain the content of Americans’ emails and other electronic communications stored with a third-party service provider, even if it is older than 180 days.

It will also require that the government notify the person whose account was disclosed, and provide him with a copy of the search warrant and other details about the information obtained. The notice has to be provided within 10 business days of receipt of the communications for a law enforcement agency, and three business days for other agencies, unless a court order to delay notification is obtained.

 

 

US demands seizure from Irish server
Tue 9 Dec 2014, 14:20

U.S. demands to seize emails stored on a Microsoft server in Ireland. According to the district court, the location of the data is not relevant and seeking cooperation with Irish authorities is not necessary for a warrant’s powers to reach abroad. However, there is “no way” the U.S. government would accept the reasoning the district court is using if other countries wanted to access data stored on U.S. soil, Microsoft said in a brief filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on Monday. If the warrant is carried out it would open the door to such seizures in the U.S., endangering the privacy of U.S. citizens, Microsoft said. The Irish government asked the European Commission for legal aid in the case.

UK Communications Data Bill supported by peers
Mon 2 Feb 2015, 19:00

Last week, several proposed adding whole sections of the defeated Communications Data Bill to the counter-terrorism legislation. The move did not receive enough support last week but the peers hope to push through the proposals on Monday.

The proposed amendments sought to require internet service providers to log more of what people do online and to make that data more easily accessible to law enforcement and security services.

The legislation has already cleared its first hurdle in the House of Lords, and undergone detailed scrutiny in committee. Peers will now embark on the first of two days' report-stage scrutiny, during which amendments will be proposed and changes made to the bill in committee considered.

Charlie Hebdo tragedy must not be used by governments to expand surveillance
Thu 29 Jan 2015, 15:40

More than 20 digital and civil rights organizations have endorsed a joint statement calling on world leaders political leaders not to expand surveillance measures in wake of the Charlie Hebdo tragedy.

EFF wins battle over secret legal opinions on government spying
Thu 29 Jan 2015, 23:20

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has won its four-year Freedom of Information Act lawsuit over secret legal interpretations of a controversial section of the Patriot Act, including legal analysis of law enforcement and intelligence agency access to census records.

The U.S. Department of Justice today filed a motion to dismiss its appeal of a ruling over legal opinions about Section 215 of the Patriot Act, the controversial provision of law relied on by the NSA to collect the call records of millions of Americans. As a result of the dismissal, the Justice Department will be forced to release a previously undisclosed opinion from the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) concerning access by law enforcement and intelligence agencies to census data under Section 215.

Cyberthreat sharing must include strong privacy protections, advocates say
Thu 29 Jan 2015, 01:20

U.S. lawmakers should put strict privacy controls into planned legislation to encourage companies to share cyberthreat information with government agencies and each other, some advocates said.

Members of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee said Wednesday they plan to work on a cyberthreat information-sharing bill in the coming months. But representatives from Microsoft and the Center for Democracy and Technology told lawmakers they can avoid the controversies of other recent bills by requiring companies and government agencies to strip out personally identifiable information before sending cyberthreat information to other organizations.