International campaign to find out whether GCHQ illegally spied on you

Since its launch on 16 February 2015, over 25 000 people have joined an international campaign to try to learn whether Britain’s intelligence agency, GCHQ, illegally spied on them.

This opportunity is possible thanks to court victory in the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT), a secret court set up to hear complaints against the British Security Services. As previously reported in the EDRi-gram, Privacy International won the first-ever case against GCHQ in the Tribunal, which ruled that the agency acted unlawfully in accessing millions of private communications collected by the US National Security Agency (NSA), up until December 2014.

Because of this victory, now anyone in the world can try to ask if their records, as collected by the NSA, were part of those communications unlawfully shared with GCHQ. We feel the public has a right to know if they were spied on illegally, and Privacy International wants to help make that as easy as possible.

Country: Global

Domains: Privacy

Stakeholder: Civil Society

Tags: electronic communications, Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT), NSA, intelligence agencies, privacy, GCHQ, illegal interceptions, surveillance, spying

Posted on Wednesday 25 February 2015

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